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Bristol Trips, Baldiness, Future Fundraising and Stuff…

It’s been a while again, but I want to thank everyone for their well wishes regarding the treatment in Bristol. The first one went well, and I’m due to go for the next on Thursday and Friday this week. The process of the treatment was simpler than I had thought it would be, and was very relaxed- each day I arrive, get hooked up to the machine, and just sit in the chair (a nice one like the dentist’s) and wait for the machine to do its thing.

All whilst looking incredibly chic in my sunglasses and bobble hat! We went for coffee after the treatment on one of the days, and the photo below was the result of my ‘cool’ outfit and a very large plant. Whoever knew Bristol Royal Infirmary was so exotic?
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Another update: I’m no longer an inpatient!!!!! I am finally home, though having to return to TCT daily for my infusions, I still need treatment for the CMV. Thankfully my bloodwork is showing the drugs ae taking an effect, so it’s all good.

The final thing I touched upon during my last ‘update’ blog was my hair. It continued to fall out over the past few weeks, so I have now shaved it off. And I’m not too upset. The transition from patchy-fally-outy to skinheadish is definitely a positive one. I may still be devastated that it has fallen out, but I’m glad I won’t have hair all over the place any more. Please remember: my being bald doesn’t mean I am suddenly more ill, or have cancer again. It’s just become a part of my post-transplant journey, something all transplantees will agree is weird, unpredictable and just plain doesn’t make sense most of the time. I’m still ill, but not. It’s a bit of a confusing place to be, this recovery phase and even more confusing to try and explain. Also, being bald DOES NOT mean I look like Sinead O’Connor. Or any other bald woman. Because I really don’t, you know except for the fact we have no hair.

I’m glad this next week is going to be a busy one, with Bristol, TCT Cardiff every day, being in uni and assignment hand ins because it’s also the anniversary of the week I found out I’d relapsed. Which means a year has gone by already. Can you believe a whole year has gone by? I’m struggling to, because though I feel like forever has passed by since everything went up sh*t creek, a year seems like such a long portion of time to know I’ve been in this way for. I may talk more about it later in the week. I don’t know. Urgh. And that means 2 years since diagnosis is impending, but also the mark of me being a year in remission (YAY)

I want to think of more positive things, stuff I’ve done and am doing. Which brings me onto announcing our next RemissionPossible fundraising event….. A Santa Run!
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There will be a full-on post coming about it soon, but get your Santa costumes, tinsel and baubles and be ready to run to beat blood cancer!

It’s going to be on the Saturday 12th December at 10am from the Olive Tree near the Oasis in Croesyceiliog, in association with Griffithstown Harriers and in aid of Bloodwise. It’s going to be fun for all, and at only 2 miles the whole family will be able to get involved! It’s only £5 to register and I can’t think of an easier way to get on Santa’s good list…

Keep your eyes peeled for more information over the next few days, but if you’re already sold, you can sign up at https://bloodwise.org.uk/event-challenges/run/family-santa-runl

Keep Smiling!

Emily 🙂

PS. A HUGE thank you to the Knitting Cwtch at Llantarnam Grange for their amazing donation of hand knitted hats. The skill and craftsmanship that has gone into them is beyond belief, as is the number! There are hats going to the Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital, Teenage Cancer Trust Cardiff and the Oncology Centre in Bristol. I will post some pictures of them being modelled when I can!

Pie Day 2014

Some of my closer friends and family will already know about Pie Day. Chances are if you’re a recent liker or follower of RemissionPossible you won’t have heard of it. Get ready to embrace a whole new family tradition this Christmas. Pie Day.pie

Now you’re listening. Everyone loves a new family tradition don’t they, whether it be the unspoken rule of not going out over the Christmas week, religiously watching the Queen’s speech or making everyone at dinner table eat a sprout. Christmas truly is a time for making the family do funny, nostalgic and ridiculous things in the name of making more family memories.

This December, save the date for the 27th of December (day after Boxing Day) because we want to see you spend it eating pie.

So why Pie Day, and why I am I making all of you do it?

It started off as a personal family tradition, when my Dad decided if we make use of Turkey Leftovers, we should make use of gravy, sprout, roast potato and other leftovers. After the cold meat day of the 26th, he made a pie of left over Christmas dinner ‘stuff’ and served it up to us. He jokingly named it the pie of all pies, and for that day to be the day of pie making, perhaps never expecting us to go on about it again.

Until the following year, when in December, we watched a Jamie Oliver programme where he was making pie, and I decided we should make it at some point. Seeing as we had pie of the 27th the year before, it was made on that day and the Day after Boxing Day has become Pie Day in my house ever since. My family, the six of us love Pie Day. It is one of our favourite family traditions and I joking have encouraged friends to partake in it, until Christmas 2013 which changed things.

Last Christmas (I gave you my heart) and Pie Day became something new, something beyond just my family. I knew I was going to be in hospital all over the Christmas period and my church and extended family wanted to do something to help, or just do something to let me know they were thinking of me, without having to have the awful ‘So you have cancer…’ talk with me. Pie Day was this outlet.

After my mum text everyone in her phonebook, and Cathy my minister spoke to the congregation we had around 50 people take part in Pie day last year. Most of them sent pictures of their pies, I had a letter off’ve one lady who had typed and specially printed the letter so it had pictures… Some of my best friends got together and had a pie making session with some of them delivered to my house, to put in the freezer so my family could eat without having to cook properly. I had tons of pictures sent to me of friends eating pie- even I it was just the humble mice pie or a big celebrity chef inspired number.

This year I want Pie Day to be bigger and better.

In years gone by, Pie Day was a fun family tradition, which dragged out the proper Christmas festivities out a bit and was massive fun. Last year, Pie Day became something else. It became a known event sure, but it also became a mechanism to show someone you’re thinking of them, and to be a time to think about whose family members or friends you can’t be with this festive season, for any reason.

I would love more people to get involved this year.

Pie Day can be what works for you. It could be you delivering a pie to someone lonely or in hospital. It could be you sitting down with a mince pie and emailing friends and colleagues who need to hear a friendly message at what can be a very hard time of year. It could be a time to invite relatives not close enough to come for Christmas Dinner over and spend time with them. It could be, as it was originally for us, a fun gimmicky tradition to use leftovers. It could be your excuse to buy that giant pork pie. It could be whatever you make it to be.

It may seem like a strange thing, a charityish blogger, urging you all to eat pie the day-after-boxing-day, without asking for donations. That is not what I want. I want it to be a time where you sit back and be with or think of those you love, and just be. Not much of Christmas is like that, not really.DSCN8153

Obviously, I’ll be celebrating Pie Day, just as much as any other festive day, and in much more style than last year. Last Pie Day I was recovering from having my Hickman line in, I still had my chest drain in and I was just a general medical mess. I’m not entirely sue whether I even ate any pie!

I just hope you all decide to join me in eating pie this 27th December. I want to hear your recipes, see your pictures and just spread a bit of love on social media. I know there are some of your reading this who were bitterly disappointed that they for one reason of another were unable to sign up to be a Stem Cell donor. Maybe you could spread the #RemissionPossible love through your pie making skills!

My mum is desperate to have a Pie Day cookbook made, so maybe with your support this year, it could become a possibility for Pie Day 2015.

Thank you for all the recent support, I really hope loads of you get involved!

Keep Smiling (and pie planning)

Emily x

P.S. As always, I want to see you signing up to the register! If and when you have, we want to see you doing your swabs/spits on social media to help spread the word. Send us a pic using #swabspitselfie to @remissionpos or post on our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/remissionpossible2014)

If you forgot (as many do) to take a #swabspitselfie take a picture of yourself with a piece of paper saying that you’ve signed up to become a lifesaver, and why. Unleash that bragging power!

P.P.S you could be a lifesaver.

To sign up…

If you’re 16-30 years old sign up at www.anthonynolan.org

If you’re 18-55 sig up at http://www.deletebloodcancer.org.uk

Bountiful to Bald…and Beyond.

So, hair loss. Fun topic eh?

However not fun, or exciting it is, it really is something I’ve felt the need to write about for a while now, and I’ve only recently felt totally in the right place to do so.

Hair loss, it’s something that I’ve been through, and so have countless other men women and children in their treatment of chemo, and sometimes Radiotherapy. Of course some other illnesses also see it occur.

As a scientific explanation for the seemingly baffling side effect of hair loss-

“Hair loss occurs because chemotherapy targets all rapidly dividing cells—healthy cells as well as cancer cells. Hair follicles, the structures in the skin filled with tiny blood vessels that make hair, are some of the fastest-growing cells in the body. If you’re not in cancer treatment, your hair follicles divide every 23 to 72 hours.”

The thing is, during chemotherapy, these cell don’t divide. Meaning the hair follicles haven’t got the cells required to stick the hair ‘in’. So, voila! Out it comes. Perhaps that’s a bit blunt. I do know the VERY scientific reason your hair follicle (and cancer) cells stop rapidly dividing. It’s because the cells spindle fibers are restricted. (I learnt that while dong my biology exam!)
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