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Mum’s on the run.

I hope this title isn’t too alarming. Don’t worry, my mother is still bringing me food, driving me places and hasn’t upped sticks and left after this getting too much for her.
What she IS doing is probably seen as just as crazy to the more horizontally inclined of us. It has involved 5.30am alarms, lycra and an attempted pasta ban (!)
Very soon she will be running the Cardiff Half Marathon, all in aid of Anthony Nolan.
Isn’t that amazing!?

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Up until now our fundraising has been mainly based around for cake, me talking at people to persuade them out of their money and bucket collects. No lycra. That’s all changed now though!

Somehow my mum has ended up a runner. I’d like to think it wasn’t my fault, but that would be total delusion! I had originally planned to do the race myself, however my body had different ideas, and bone marrow transplants don’t train you very well for much beyond the sofa! Thankfully my mum doesn’t blame me completely and has another reason bar it being in replacement of/on my behalf.
Linking nicely with it being for Anthony Nolan, she wanted to improve her health- so that if she were to be called up to be a bone marrow donor for someone else, she would pass the medical.
See what I mean when I say my mum is fab!
Please, I feel I’ve kept it quiet but I really have spent most of this summer in hospital. It would have been incredibly easy for her to have given up, passed her place on and just not given herself the stress of juggling training as well as me/other 3 kids/ hospital/stuff.

I don’t want this blog to be all ‘my mum, my mum’….she does have her own voice.

“We started like so many as part of a New Years resolution. Couch to 5k  was our aim. Week one after 43 seconds I was broken. Admittedly I hadn’t run since 1985 when I did 800 meters, but we kept with it. I have run every week since. Sometimes in the snow, around the car park while Emily has been in radiotherapy, sometimes so early Lobby isn’t up (!) We have surprised those around us and amazed  ourselves.”

It’s not just her though- she has formed ‘Team RemissionPossible’ with two other school mums and between them they are also running for Bloodwise and Look Good Feel Better. All worthy causes I think you’ll agree. For me, between them they represent my passions in charity work to with cancer-
– Bloodwise are funding research to try and bring the day when all 137 types of blood cancer are cured, and make the treatments kinder.
– Anthony Nolan are finding lifesaving matches for people who need bone marrow transplants  (need I say any more?!)
– Look Good Feel Better are all about making that time with cancer easier, by reinstilling women and girls with confidence in themselves. As a recipient of this charity’s work I can surely say if you look good, you do feel better!

So mum (Donna) , Rachel and Victoria, Tanya and Beth- I think you’re bonkers but amazing! While I had intended on doing the run myself, you would never have seen me tackling a 10 mile run on a Sunday morning, nor leaving early enough to be BACK in time to make breakfast! Heroes.

I’d love it if you could take a moment and donate some money towards their cause. The support will get them through the miles but MORE IMPORTANTLY fund the awesome work if the charities that have contributed so immensely into getting me where I am today. I can certainly say without the work of Bloodwise and Anthony Nolan I wouldn’t be typing these words, and without Look Good Feel Better I wouldn’t be doing it with as much confidence. 
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Remember, every little helps! Here’s their team page where you can donate to their induvidual pages https://www.justgiving.com/teams/Run4Remission

Keep Smiling (and running) 💃💃💃👟
Emily

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Guest Blog: Why I Joined Marrow.

This guest blog is from Ellie Philpotts, a Cardiff Uni Student and staunch Marrow supporter 

When you join university, you’re thrown into a new world. Societies are all scrambling to recruit you, usually with the lure of free food; Dominos are handing out pizza in the hopes of getting their local branch on your radar (which probably doesn’t need much persuasion); clubs compete for your attention via the cheapest Jager-Bomb, and lecturers are trying to regain their last threads of sanity reminding students to actually attend classes during those crucial first weeks. But amid this relentless craziness, one society caught my eye – and, sorry to be clichéd, but, also my heart.
Considering this is my guest blog for the amazing Remission Possible, a charity/site set up by blood cancer fighter Emily Clark, you may not be surprised by my revelation that this society was… Marrow!
Most big universities now operate a branch of Marrow, the brainchild of Anthony Nolan, Britain’s main blood cancer charity. Their primary mission is getting the public on the bone marrow register, and Marrow is the side of it that’s both run by, and generally aimed at, students. This means we host recruitment drives at uni, signing eager students (consenting, of course!) onto the bone marrow register, which means taking a simple saliva sample from them. We also arrange events such as our successful Variety Night last month, featuring an array of comedy, dance and live bands, and carolling in Cardiff city centre around Christmas, raising awareness and donations. The Marrow team was the first society I joined when I began at Cardiff University in September 2014, and although I’m also part of many more societies now, they’re definitely my favourites in that they’re the ones I’m most passionate about. So much so, this week I’ve been confirmed to have the role of their Media Coordinator, starting in September. This means I’ll be in charge of our social media, namely Twitter and Facebook updates; Public Relations and Marketing – responsibilities including getting the word out there of Cardiff Marrow, wider Anthony Nolan and actual bone marrow donation; informing of our specific events; and liaising with the public and local/national media to make our amazing cause even more well-known around the ‘Diff and beyond.
So I’ve said about how I completely don’t regret dedicating my rare free time at uni volunteering for Cardiff Marrow. But what actually attracted me into joining? No, their stall at Freshers’ Week was a rare one which didn’t boast free food – simply because they don’t need to rely on things like that. The knowledge that you’re truly helping to save lives kind of beats even the nicest slice of pizza!

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In January 2011, when I was 15, I was diagnosed with blood cancer myself – Hodgkins Lymphoma to be precise. I finished chemo and steroids in May 2011, receiving most of this at Birmingham Children’s Hospital. Through Teenage Cancer Trust, I’ve met so many incredible people, many of whom have had transplants themselves. People with mine and Emily’s form of cancer, lymphoma, often need bone marrow or stem cell transplants, like Emily herself began this year, and I realised that could’ve easily been the case with my specific illness.
In 2012, a girl in my cancer group, Becky Bishop, who also had Hodgkins, died aged only 16. She’d began the transplant process herself, and greatly inspired me during my recovery. I’d say the combination of my own case; Becky’s situation and seeing so many others struggling to find donors really launched my passion of Anthony Nolan’s work.
I’m really looking forward to starting my Cardiff Marrow committee role and would love to work more with Remission Possible through this. Emily’s venture is an incredible idea and she’s doing amazingly, running this while undergoing the effects of her transplant. Emily, you’re a massive inspiration to me and many others. Keep on Remission Possible-ing and I’ll keep Marrowing 🙂

Pie Day 2014

Some of my closer friends and family will already know about Pie Day. Chances are if you’re a recent liker or follower of RemissionPossible you won’t have heard of it. Get ready to embrace a whole new family tradition this Christmas. Pie Day.pie

Now you’re listening. Everyone loves a new family tradition don’t they, whether it be the unspoken rule of not going out over the Christmas week, religiously watching the Queen’s speech or making everyone at dinner table eat a sprout. Christmas truly is a time for making the family do funny, nostalgic and ridiculous things in the name of making more family memories.

This December, save the date for the 27th of December (day after Boxing Day) because we want to see you spend it eating pie.

So why Pie Day, and why I am I making all of you do it?

It started off as a personal family tradition, when my Dad decided if we make use of Turkey Leftovers, we should make use of gravy, sprout, roast potato and other leftovers. After the cold meat day of the 26th, he made a pie of left over Christmas dinner ‘stuff’ and served it up to us. He jokingly named it the pie of all pies, and for that day to be the day of pie making, perhaps never expecting us to go on about it again.

Until the following year, when in December, we watched a Jamie Oliver programme where he was making pie, and I decided we should make it at some point. Seeing as we had pie of the 27th the year before, it was made on that day and the Day after Boxing Day has become Pie Day in my house ever since. My family, the six of us love Pie Day. It is one of our favourite family traditions and I joking have encouraged friends to partake in it, until Christmas 2013 which changed things.

Last Christmas (I gave you my heart) and Pie Day became something new, something beyond just my family. I knew I was going to be in hospital all over the Christmas period and my church and extended family wanted to do something to help, or just do something to let me know they were thinking of me, without having to have the awful ‘So you have cancer…’ talk with me. Pie Day was this outlet.

After my mum text everyone in her phonebook, and Cathy my minister spoke to the congregation we had around 50 people take part in Pie day last year. Most of them sent pictures of their pies, I had a letter off’ve one lady who had typed and specially printed the letter so it had pictures… Some of my best friends got together and had a pie making session with some of them delivered to my house, to put in the freezer so my family could eat without having to cook properly. I had tons of pictures sent to me of friends eating pie- even I it was just the humble mice pie or a big celebrity chef inspired number.

This year I want Pie Day to be bigger and better.

In years gone by, Pie Day was a fun family tradition, which dragged out the proper Christmas festivities out a bit and was massive fun. Last year, Pie Day became something else. It became a known event sure, but it also became a mechanism to show someone you’re thinking of them, and to be a time to think about whose family members or friends you can’t be with this festive season, for any reason.

I would love more people to get involved this year.

Pie Day can be what works for you. It could be you delivering a pie to someone lonely or in hospital. It could be you sitting down with a mince pie and emailing friends and colleagues who need to hear a friendly message at what can be a very hard time of year. It could be a time to invite relatives not close enough to come for Christmas Dinner over and spend time with them. It could be, as it was originally for us, a fun gimmicky tradition to use leftovers. It could be your excuse to buy that giant pork pie. It could be whatever you make it to be.

It may seem like a strange thing, a charityish blogger, urging you all to eat pie the day-after-boxing-day, without asking for donations. That is not what I want. I want it to be a time where you sit back and be with or think of those you love, and just be. Not much of Christmas is like that, not really.DSCN8153

Obviously, I’ll be celebrating Pie Day, just as much as any other festive day, and in much more style than last year. Last Pie Day I was recovering from having my Hickman line in, I still had my chest drain in and I was just a general medical mess. I’m not entirely sue whether I even ate any pie!

I just hope you all decide to join me in eating pie this 27th December. I want to hear your recipes, see your pictures and just spread a bit of love on social media. I know there are some of your reading this who were bitterly disappointed that they for one reason of another were unable to sign up to be a Stem Cell donor. Maybe you could spread the #RemissionPossible love through your pie making skills!

My mum is desperate to have a Pie Day cookbook made, so maybe with your support this year, it could become a possibility for Pie Day 2015.

Thank you for all the recent support, I really hope loads of you get involved!

Keep Smiling (and pie planning)

Emily x

P.S. As always, I want to see you signing up to the register! If and when you have, we want to see you doing your swabs/spits on social media to help spread the word. Send us a pic using #swabspitselfie to @remissionpos or post on our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/remissionpossible2014)

If you forgot (as many do) to take a #swabspitselfie take a picture of yourself with a piece of paper saying that you’ve signed up to become a lifesaver, and why. Unleash that bragging power!

P.P.S you could be a lifesaver.

To sign up…

If you’re 16-30 years old sign up at www.anthonynolan.org

If you’re 18-55 sig up at http://www.deletebloodcancer.org.uk

It’s not over til the Fat Lady sings.

Some bad news today I’m afraid.

It’s something I had always hoped I would never have to blog about, and something more frightening to those affected by cancer than the initial diagnosis. I can’t quite believe that I’m writing this blog.

Relapse, recurrence, end of remission are just three ways to describe it.

Yes, s**tily enough, my cancer has come back.

*inserts crying, swearing, and general negative emotions here*

This is why I’ve been so quiet recently, in blogging and social media.

So, as of last Thursday, when I got sat down with my consultant and told the results of my scan, I am once again a cancer sufferer/patient/whatever. I have Non Hodgkin Lymphoma, again. This time, I’m 17. This time I have a university application to cancel. This time I’m being open about it, broadcasting almost. This time I might need YOUR help. I am of course devastated, I had just applied you University and my life was getting back on track. There’s not much point in moping over it all though.

Now I’m not dying, please don’t think that. There is a plan, there is treatment, and I will get through this again. Second time round though there are quite a few differences in approach.

I’m going to need a Bone Marrow (stem cell) transplant. The very thing I’ve been harping onto you all about infrequently, is now going to save my own life. Seeing as chemotherapy clearly hasn’t gotten rid of my cancer for good, this time we’re bringing out all the weaponry, guns blazing to kick this cancer’s ass, good and proper, and forever. I will have more chemo, and then the transplant.

Some of you may be in the know, but a bone marrow (stem cell) transplant involves the donation of stem cells from someone with matching HLA groups, which ae transplanted into someone who needs the ells, to beat their cancer or other blood disease. The donor will be a living person, who will not suffer any major side effects from donating, just the knowledge that you have helped potentially save someone’s life.

My transplant donation will come from someone selfless, as above. My 15 year old sister will be tested to see if she is a match for me, but this is only a 25% chance. The likelihood is that I will have cells donated from an unrelated donor, a stranger. A hero.

If I have a stranger donor, it will be because they signed to a registry and made a ‘pledge’ that they would donate if they were ever needed.

I’m asking something now of all you reading this blog. Please, if you are able to sign up to be a potential Bone Marrow (stem cell) donor. It will increase the chances of there being a match for me when the time comes, and could help one of the other 1,800 people who will need a transplant this year, in the UK alone. Or you may help someone net year, or the year after, or even someone overseas. The possibilities are vast.

This Bone Marrow donor business, is something I guess most pople will at least have heard about, especially if they are a follower of this blog. The thing is, it’s not just someone needing you to become a lifesaver. Now, it’s me- Emily Clark, the teen pinning these words down, the girl who aspires to be a doctor and loves to sing is the one urging you to join a registry. If it has been something you’ve just scrolled on past or dismissed as irrelevant SIT UP AND LISTEN. It’s real for me now. Really, really real. I hope an emotion within you, whether it be sorrow because of my cancer returning, empathy and pity for ‘that’ girl with cancer, or admiration incites a want to SIGN UP.

There is more concise information on my Become a Lifesaver: Join the stem cell register page, but for now, focus on what your reaction would be if I were your sibling, child, parent, family member or friend (maybe I am) would you immediately sign up? Would you offer to be tested to see if you could donate? If the answer is yes, then please join the register, or at least enquire to find out more. Do it for me, do it for the other 1,800 people.

So many of you, when faced with bad news think ‘I wish there was something I could do to help.’ To put it frankly there is.

If you are 16-30 years old, sign up to be a lifesaver via www.anthonynolan.org

If you are 18-55 years old, be a hero and sign up at www.deletebloodcancer.org.uk

I can’t ask in any other way, and I hope what I’ve done shows quite how important this cause is.

Imagine the impact if everyone reading this signed up, and then got Just One More to sign up, who got someone else to sign up….so on and so forth. We could make a massive difference. I say we, it’s only you who can get the ball rolling.

This has been hard to write, and even harder to post, but I hope it makes an impact.

I’ve been in remission once, and I will be again, hopefully soon. I’ve said before, together we can help #makeRemissionPossible

I’ll keep you all up to date on me, I’m having my Hickman Line put in tomorrow.

Keep smiling,

Em x

Blog 9- Pants on Head

Hi all! Bet I can guess what you’re thinking…. PANTS on HEAD?!?!?!?!

Well watch the video below to find out what the hoosit I’m going on about! (but first read about me!)

So I’ve been busy busy as per usual, but not with RemissionPossible stuff so much….but with SCHOOL!

I’ve gone back into school  properly this week, and have been absolutely LOVING it! It really has to be said I am such a nerd. A part of my school  stuff is doing my WelshBacc individual investigation. Cry. Now, because I am interested in a career in medical research, my investigation needs to look at a topic surrounding this- anyone have any ideas??? If anyone reading this is a research scientist PLEASE help!

Also I auditioned for my school’s annual musical tday- Jesus Christ Superstar. I love doing shows, yet am not particularly drama-ry…. It’s just too much fun!

I have three things tied for top exciting thing of the week-

1. I’m visiting Bristol uni open day tomorrow, and some of their courses sound A-MAZ-ING.

2. Harney Sons & Teas have confirmed they will be sending tea for the gift boxes!

3. The recipient of the Gift box really appreciated it, and said it was the most thoughtful gift they had received. (look back to an earlier blog (7) for more details.

I’ve also been looking into some fundraising ides, including a dress up day for my 6th form!

NOW, onto the VLOG

 

 

HELP HOLLIE #putyourpantsonyourhead @helphollie

Help save the life of this 8 year old girl.

Sign up to be a stem cell donor at http://www.anthonynolan.org (16-30yrs)

OR at http://www.deletebloodcancer.org.uk (18-55yrs)1403208848797

YOU COULD SAVE HER LIFE.

PLEASE consider signing up.

Thanks.

Keep Smiling.

Em x

 

(sorry about the film quality)