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Pie Day 2014

Some of my closer friends and family will already know about Pie Day. Chances are if you’re a recent liker or follower of RemissionPossible you won’t have heard of it. Get ready to embrace a whole new family tradition this Christmas. Pie Day.pie

Now you’re listening. Everyone loves a new family tradition don’t they, whether it be the unspoken rule of not going out over the Christmas week, religiously watching the Queen’s speech or making everyone at dinner table eat a sprout. Christmas truly is a time for making the family do funny, nostalgic and ridiculous things in the name of making more family memories.

This December, save the date for the 27th of December (day after Boxing Day) because we want to see you spend it eating pie.

So why Pie Day, and why I am I making all of you do it?

It started off as a personal family tradition, when my Dad decided if we make use of Turkey Leftovers, we should make use of gravy, sprout, roast potato and other leftovers. After the cold meat day of the 26th, he made a pie of left over Christmas dinner ‘stuff’ and served it up to us. He jokingly named it the pie of all pies, and for that day to be the day of pie making, perhaps never expecting us to go on about it again.

Until the following year, when in December, we watched a Jamie Oliver programme where he was making pie, and I decided we should make it at some point. Seeing as we had pie of the 27th the year before, it was made on that day and the Day after Boxing Day has become Pie Day in my house ever since. My family, the six of us love Pie Day. It is one of our favourite family traditions and I joking have encouraged friends to partake in it, until Christmas 2013 which changed things.

Last Christmas (I gave you my heart) and Pie Day became something new, something beyond just my family. I knew I was going to be in hospital all over the Christmas period and my church and extended family wanted to do something to help, or just do something to let me know they were thinking of me, without having to have the awful ‘So you have cancer…’ talk with me. Pie Day was this outlet.

After my mum text everyone in her phonebook, and Cathy my minister spoke to the congregation we had around 50 people take part in Pie day last year. Most of them sent pictures of their pies, I had a letter off’ve one lady who had typed and specially printed the letter so it had pictures… Some of my best friends got together and had a pie making session with some of them delivered to my house, to put in the freezer so my family could eat without having to cook properly. I had tons of pictures sent to me of friends eating pie- even I it was just the humble mice pie or a big celebrity chef inspired number.

This year I want Pie Day to be bigger and better.

In years gone by, Pie Day was a fun family tradition, which dragged out the proper Christmas festivities out a bit and was massive fun. Last year, Pie Day became something else. It became a known event sure, but it also became a mechanism to show someone you’re thinking of them, and to be a time to think about whose family members or friends you can’t be with this festive season, for any reason.

I would love more people to get involved this year.

Pie Day can be what works for you. It could be you delivering a pie to someone lonely or in hospital. It could be you sitting down with a mince pie and emailing friends and colleagues who need to hear a friendly message at what can be a very hard time of year. It could be a time to invite relatives not close enough to come for Christmas Dinner over and spend time with them. It could be, as it was originally for us, a fun gimmicky tradition to use leftovers. It could be your excuse to buy that giant pork pie. It could be whatever you make it to be.

It may seem like a strange thing, a charityish blogger, urging you all to eat pie the day-after-boxing-day, without asking for donations. That is not what I want. I want it to be a time where you sit back and be with or think of those you love, and just be. Not much of Christmas is like that, not really.DSCN8153

Obviously, I’ll be celebrating Pie Day, just as much as any other festive day, and in much more style than last year. Last Pie Day I was recovering from having my Hickman line in, I still had my chest drain in and I was just a general medical mess. I’m not entirely sue whether I even ate any pie!

I just hope you all decide to join me in eating pie this 27th December. I want to hear your recipes, see your pictures and just spread a bit of love on social media. I know there are some of your reading this who were bitterly disappointed that they for one reason of another were unable to sign up to be a Stem Cell donor. Maybe you could spread the #RemissionPossible love through your pie making skills!

My mum is desperate to have a Pie Day cookbook made, so maybe with your support this year, it could become a possibility for Pie Day 2015.

Thank you for all the recent support, I really hope loads of you get involved!

Keep Smiling (and pie planning)

Emily x

P.S. As always, I want to see you signing up to the register! If and when you have, we want to see you doing your swabs/spits on social media to help spread the word. Send us a pic using #swabspitselfie to @remissionpos or post on our Facebook page (www.facebook.com/remissionpossible2014)

If you forgot (as many do) to take a #swabspitselfie take a picture of yourself with a piece of paper saying that you’ve signed up to become a lifesaver, and why. Unleash that bragging power!

P.P.S you could be a lifesaver.

To sign up…

If you’re 16-30 years old sign up at www.anthonynolan.org

If you’re 18-55 sig up at http://www.deletebloodcancer.org.uk

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Why I love…the Teenage Cancer Trust

With tonight being Halloween a blog about the Teenage Cancer Trust may not seem to be as topical as you may want to be reading. Halloween is the night of tricks and treats, frights, spooks, gory make up and if you’re unlucky enough a dosing of flour and eggs.

For many Halloween is terrifying, and seeing as I’m sat here blogging you can tell I’m not the biggest fan of such frights. images (1)

I didn’t want to talk topically about fear, frights shock or horror because we all know tha cancer is full of that without me boring you with a blog about it. I guess most of you know or can imagine the gut wrenching awfulness that comes with a cancer diagnosis as a teen, so why draw it out. Instead this blog is about some people I love, the people who make it all ‘ok’ (as ok as it can get) These are the people who as a Halloween-o-phobe you open the door to expecting a ghoul and find a fairy princess there.

So who are these people? Well if you’ve read the top, they are the Teenage Cancer Trust, a charity that before a personal connection most people probably hadn’t heard of before this year, and a charity that deserves much more attention than they get. A charity who I just described as the Fairy Princess of a teenage cancer diagnosis.

If you have no previous connection to Teenage Cancer Trust and don’t really know who they are, or what they do, you will be blown away. By building wards for cancer patients they give the opportunity for teenage patients to be in their natural place- with other teens and young people, even when they’re having treatment. It allows them to have space, watch TV and have some of the choices you would have in your own home. It allows young people, like me to be in their own, with their own and not with the babies or the grannies.

And why do I love them? Concisely put, they made the difference between hope and defeat in the face of my own diagnosis nearly a year ago. They made the difference between being with other teens, and being with 80 year old women telling me about how you I am. They made the difference between normal conversation and well meant pity and grandchild chatting. I firmly feel that an ordinary ward has a much more pessimistic feel than any TCT ward, with big colourful sofas and random light up jukeboxes.k

I love what they do so much, I love what they stand for and I love Roger Daultrey. I love the ethos that a hospital ward shouldn’t have to look like a hospital ward. I love that you can have friends to visit. I love that when they do visit you don’t have to be huddled around a hospital bed, that you can play (I tried!) pool, watch films or just chat.

The difference it makes, to be around others your own age, for them to also be bald, lugging around drip stands and have a complete understanding everything that is happening is completely priceless. I do think it is the friends from the TCT ward that I made that got me through treatment.

 

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I inhabited the best at the front of the picture for the best part of 2 months, which when I was put in another bed resulted in my mum walking in on the poor girl in it several times!

My diagnosis was an extremely confusing time. Having my consultant be able to say ‘let me take you to the ward, it’s where you’ll be looked after’ and even with a quick off-the-cuff visit to be able to speak to some nurses, the ward manager, and day doctor is incredibly reassuring. My mum often says that she saw a light when we got to that ward, that she thought everything would be alright after arriving there. She takes pleasure in describing the Cardiff ward, the Skypad as looking like a penthouse youth club. To be fair to my mum, that’s exactly what it looks like.

If you haven’t quite got it already, the Teenage Cancer Trust are more than just people who build wards, and they are much more than a name of a collecting tin, the name of something ‘which would never happen to me’. Teenage Cancer Trust means you are supported, so that when you’re ill on Christmas morning, there’s a nurse dance around your bed. The teenage cancer trust means that when all you want is duck pancakes, your mum can cook some in a microwave for you. The Teenage Cancer Trust means that when your brother visits you, he can watch TV with you, and it isn’t a case of ‘let’s stare at Emily for the next hour’. It meant that I have made amazing friends. I meant while I was sleeping, my mum had other mums to sit and eat breakfast with. It meant everything really. Everything and so much more because I am here to tell the world of my love for this charity. Hey deserve every penny they get because that penny will go towards providing lifesaving treatment to someone like me.

Everything they do may seem simple, grouping teens together for chemo, but it is so so much more than a room to have treatment in. A place for treatment, but also a place to try and live, when your life isn’t yours to be lived, but tucked away in a box.

I love Teenage Cancer Trust, because they are there for you wholeheartedly in a time of need that you never thought imaginable.

If you want to see some more pictures of the teenage cancer trust ward yourself, (the above are from Cardiff) or find out more about the awesome stuff they do, check out www.teenagecancertrust.org

Hope you liked this blog, enjoy the rest of this spooktacular night!

Keep smiling (and trick or treating!)🎃

-Em xx

 

Why I love…the NHS

I love the NHS.

I love the NHS, that’s right, I love it. I am so relieved to get that off’ve my chest, you all now know my-not-so-secret love, deeper than the oceans and wider than space.

NHS. Three letters, or three words. National Health Service. Such romantic words, so originally named.

Of course I’m not having a romantic relationship with a public tax funded, government designed, political minefield of a health system, but I often feel like I might as well be. I’ll say it one more time- I love the NHS.

But, WHY do I love the NHS so much?

Well the answer is obvious- it saved my life and it will have almost undoubtedly helped you at some point or another (we were all born once remember!) The NHS is a lifesaver, and I owe everything to it.
Read the rest of this entry

Remission…..Day 1 and Blog 1

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I’m in REMISSION!!! Simply amazing. It seems a great place to start the blog from, the 18th of April 2014, and my first full day officially cancer free!! It has been a long time coming, April seemed an absolute age away back in January-but I’ve made it!!!

The feeling running through me right now cannot be explained, not really. Just buzzing, for lack of a better word!

Through the support of my family, doctors, the Teenage Cancer trust and faith I’ve arrived at my own remission possible victory! And somehow, along the way we have managed to raise (and support raising) nearly £5000 and persuade one person who’s never donate before to give blood!! Rest assured everyone- THIS is just the start.20140417_191110

As the website says, as the starter-upper of RemissionPossible, I want to help get as many people as possible into remission, and back to living life, in whatever way our initiative can do that!

Happy birthday to my brother, happy remssionday for me yesterday and happy good Friday to you all!!

There will be more to come soon….

Keep Smiling,  and help spread this around,

-Em xx