Category Archives: Charities special to us.

Boredom and Beating Blood Cancer.

Is it possible to be busy to the point of mania, yet chronically bored at the same time? That’s how the past few weeks have felt to me at least.
Yes, I’ve been back in hospital again… but  was  discharged on Wednesday and am ready to get into the Christmas spirit!

There’s been nothing different to what we’re usually  dealing with, more CMV issues and a line infection, but in true RemissionPossible style I’ve cleared the infection, saved the apheresis line and my suggestion for continuing CMV treatment appears (so far) to actually have been the best decision we could have made… Go me!
Most of the manic stress has come my need to micromanage my care and make sure all the different people who need to communicate with each other and do things actually communicate and do them. Assumptions have caused me a lot of issues… If you want something done, do it yourself is the case sometimes I feel, and have felt quite a lot recently
Adding uni deadlines and Christmas  to all this certainly hasn’t helped!

Somehow, but predictably there’s been such boredom….. The longing to be out of hospital walls has been  overwhelming at times. No lie, there is a new F1 doctor who didn’t want to have to see me yesterday….not for there having been issues in care but because I had literally cried on frustration, anger or sadness every time he had ever seen me! Bless him, he was terrified of having to deal with that again. That’s how it’s been though, me twiddling my thumbs, wondering when on earth my body is going to sort itself out!
But I’m out now, and ready to get all festive so I’ll tell you about the  few genuinely interesting things I’ve been up to recently. The two things that I’ve been most excited to tell you about are both Bloodwise related!
The first was a bit of a while ago now….

Back in November I attended Bloodwise’s research open morning, where they showcased he current research going on in Cardiff (and gave all the ‘regulars’ a chance to catch up!)
You all know I’m a total science geek so attending a morning where numerous scientists were talking about their work and at the complete mercy of my questions was fab. The work the researchers are doing is simply mind blowing, and seeing the innovative way they were working to solve problems was inspiring for a girl aspiring to be one of them. Most know my discomfort around the word inspire, so that’s a big thing for me to say.
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The morning had a very informal format where the researchers were available in the labs for you to wander between and chat to, which allowed a very different experience to usual conference type events.
My favourite thing was seeing a model that had been built of blood vessels to do investigation into endothelial cells that would reflect how CLL cells actually act in the blood – petri dishes can’t show the impact pressures and other factors have on how leukaemia cells actually behave. The main reason for using it was to see what potential treatments would stop chronic leukaemia cells entering passing through the endothelial cells into lymphatic tissues, the thing that allows the condition to worsen. The cases that result in a build up of leukemic cells in the lymph glands are generally the hardest to treat and the most aggressive.

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The blood vessel model

 

Hearing about targeted therapy was also incredibly exciting, because it will lead to less harsh treatment, better survival and ultimately the day when we don’t see people having to endure numerous regimes before finding one that works – lab work will soon be able to guide clinicians to choose a treatment that has already been proven to work on a sample of that patient’s cells. I’ve seen people go through the anguish of treatments failing, or having resistance, so the idea of ending that is very hopeful.
I am aware I’m not explaining this very well at all, and that it probably comes across as boring but I assure you that it was fascinating!

There was a lot of talk about targeted therapies across the different researchers, with some using flow cytometry to see the abnormalities in patient blood components at diagnosis, then monitoring as they normalise, to looking a how the telomeres on the cancer’s DNA can indicate the level of treatment needed.
I’ve also been invited to spend a bit more time watching the team do their work, which I’m looking forward to.

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Microscope Images of Endothelial Cells

 

If all that above meant nothing to you (or if it should have and I recounted it terribly!) here’s something I heard that’s a little less PhD and more personal blog and an analogy very befitting to this time of year.- Cancer being that guy at the party, the one who shows up, parties hard, drinks hard, drinks everything, then when everyone else is exhausted by him, cancer carries on, stealing every last remnant of food and drink from everyone else, until he’s the only one left going and everyone else (the cells) are passed out, done….

Paints a picture, right?

 

So the fb_img_1449933998775.jpgother things that we’ve been up to with Bloodwise is running!       We held our Santa Run last Saturday and I feel it was a huge success. Though I’m still not sure on fundraising totals,  we had around 115 Santa’s and elves running, all of them looking absolutely fabulous.

All sorts got involved, with a few buggies getting in on the action, and a scooter thanks to my sister. Some ran it in a breeze, others struggled…all finished and got themselves on Santa’s Good List for this year!

Big thanks to Griffithstown Harriers for helping organise, Be the Best Military Fitness for the fab warm up and The Olive Tree for selling tea/ coffee and giving us use of the room.

Everyone who ran, or donated are helping to fund the work I witnessed in the labs and are helping to cure blood cancer. The money that was raised will make a huge difference in meaning those scientists are funded in doing their work so passionately. 12316665_10153465486638768_8056995079494181193_n

I can’t thank everyone who came enough. Showing up and running those two miles was something a lot of people would have never considered doing, but fundraising aside, it gave me a real boost.
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That’s it from me for now. I hope everyone else is beginning to feel a lot like Christmas!

Keep Smiling (and scrolling for Santa pics….)

Emily 🙂

 

 

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Santa Run for Bloodwise

Fancy getting yourself on Santa’s good list?
Need an excuse for ‘just one more’ mince pie?
Fancy showing the kids you’re not that unfit?
Want to help us save the lives of people with blood cancer, now and in the future?

OUR FAMILY SANTA RUN COULD BE THE EVENT FOR YOU!

As a child, the local Santa run around Croesyceiliog and Cwmbran Boating Lake was a big part of the run up to Christmas. Though admittedly I never took part, as a family we would go along to cheer on the runners, pick out our favourite Santa costumes and put some money in the buckets for charity. It was always a great morning out, a real community event where with runners and spectators, hundreds of people would be together, getting into the Christmas spirit. I would be waving my letter hoping to spot the real one.It’s now been several years since the last run, and we have decided to do something about it!

We want to create a fun filled morning, where everyone can enjoy a bit of pre-christmas cheer in the fresh air, get the community together- just do something that doesn’t involve hospitals….somewhere my family has spent the last two Christmases centred around. All this and raise some well deserved dosh for Bloodwise!

So who are Bloodwise?

Formerly Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research, Bloodwise were set up in 1960 by the Eastwood family after their daughter, Susan passed away from Leukaemia. The charity helped set up the first ever research unit dedicated to blood cancers in Great Ormond Street, and have played a huge part in seeing that 2/3rds of people diagnosed with Leukaemia, lymphoma or other blood cancers survive 5 years. In 1960, almost everyone died of their disease.
Yet they still have so much to do.

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Bristol Trips, Baldiness, Future Fundraising and Stuff…

It’s been a while again, but I want to thank everyone for their well wishes regarding the treatment in Bristol. The first one went well, and I’m due to go for the next on Thursday and Friday this week. The process of the treatment was simpler than I had thought it would be, and was very relaxed- each day I arrive, get hooked up to the machine, and just sit in the chair (a nice one like the dentist’s) and wait for the machine to do its thing.

All whilst looking incredibly chic in my sunglasses and bobble hat! We went for coffee after the treatment on one of the days, and the photo below was the result of my ‘cool’ outfit and a very large plant. Whoever knew Bristol Royal Infirmary was so exotic?
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Another update: I’m no longer an inpatient!!!!! I am finally home, though having to return to TCT daily for my infusions, I still need treatment for the CMV. Thankfully my bloodwork is showing the drugs ae taking an effect, so it’s all good.

The final thing I touched upon during my last ‘update’ blog was my hair. It continued to fall out over the past few weeks, so I have now shaved it off. And I’m not too upset. The transition from patchy-fally-outy to skinheadish is definitely a positive one. I may still be devastated that it has fallen out, but I’m glad I won’t have hair all over the place any more. Please remember: my being bald doesn’t mean I am suddenly more ill, or have cancer again. It’s just become a part of my post-transplant journey, something all transplantees will agree is weird, unpredictable and just plain doesn’t make sense most of the time. I’m still ill, but not. It’s a bit of a confusing place to be, this recovery phase and even more confusing to try and explain. Also, being bald DOES NOT mean I look like Sinead O’Connor. Or any other bald woman. Because I really don’t, you know except for the fact we have no hair.

I’m glad this next week is going to be a busy one, with Bristol, TCT Cardiff every day, being in uni and assignment hand ins because it’s also the anniversary of the week I found out I’d relapsed. Which means a year has gone by already. Can you believe a whole year has gone by? I’m struggling to, because though I feel like forever has passed by since everything went up sh*t creek, a year seems like such a long portion of time to know I’ve been in this way for. I may talk more about it later in the week. I don’t know. Urgh. And that means 2 years since diagnosis is impending, but also the mark of me being a year in remission (YAY)

I want to think of more positive things, stuff I’ve done and am doing. Which brings me onto announcing our next RemissionPossible fundraising event….. A Santa Run!
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There will be a full-on post coming about it soon, but get your Santa costumes, tinsel and baubles and be ready to run to beat blood cancer!

It’s going to be on the Saturday 12th December at 10am from the Olive Tree near the Oasis in Croesyceiliog, in association with Griffithstown Harriers and in aid of Bloodwise. It’s going to be fun for all, and at only 2 miles the whole family will be able to get involved! It’s only £5 to register and I can’t think of an easier way to get on Santa’s good list…

Keep your eyes peeled for more information over the next few days, but if you’re already sold, you can sign up at https://bloodwise.org.uk/event-challenges/run/family-santa-runl

Keep Smiling!

Emily 🙂

PS. A HUGE thank you to the Knitting Cwtch at Llantarnam Grange for their amazing donation of hand knitted hats. The skill and craftsmanship that has gone into them is beyond belief, as is the number! There are hats going to the Noah’s Ark Children’s Hospital, Teenage Cancer Trust Cardiff and the Oncology Centre in Bristol. I will post some pictures of them being modelled when I can!

Mum’s on the run.

I hope this title isn’t too alarming. Don’t worry, my mother is still bringing me food, driving me places and hasn’t upped sticks and left after this getting too much for her.
What she IS doing is probably seen as just as crazy to the more horizontally inclined of us. It has involved 5.30am alarms, lycra and an attempted pasta ban (!)
Very soon she will be running the Cardiff Half Marathon, all in aid of Anthony Nolan.
Isn’t that amazing!?

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Up until now our fundraising has been mainly based around for cake, me talking at people to persuade them out of their money and bucket collects. No lycra. That’s all changed now though!

Somehow my mum has ended up a runner. I’d like to think it wasn’t my fault, but that would be total delusion! I had originally planned to do the race myself, however my body had different ideas, and bone marrow transplants don’t train you very well for much beyond the sofa! Thankfully my mum doesn’t blame me completely and has another reason bar it being in replacement of/on my behalf.
Linking nicely with it being for Anthony Nolan, she wanted to improve her health- so that if she were to be called up to be a bone marrow donor for someone else, she would pass the medical.
See what I mean when I say my mum is fab!
Please, I feel I’ve kept it quiet but I really have spent most of this summer in hospital. It would have been incredibly easy for her to have given up, passed her place on and just not given herself the stress of juggling training as well as me/other 3 kids/ hospital/stuff.

I don’t want this blog to be all ‘my mum, my mum’….she does have her own voice.

“We started like so many as part of a New Years resolution. Couch to 5k  was our aim. Week one after 43 seconds I was broken. Admittedly I hadn’t run since 1985 when I did 800 meters, but we kept with it. I have run every week since. Sometimes in the snow, around the car park while Emily has been in radiotherapy, sometimes so early Lobby isn’t up (!) We have surprised those around us and amazed  ourselves.”

It’s not just her though- she has formed ‘Team RemissionPossible’ with two other school mums and between them they are also running for Bloodwise and Look Good Feel Better. All worthy causes I think you’ll agree. For me, between them they represent my passions in charity work to with cancer-
– Bloodwise are funding research to try and bring the day when all 137 types of blood cancer are cured, and make the treatments kinder.
– Anthony Nolan are finding lifesaving matches for people who need bone marrow transplants  (need I say any more?!)
– Look Good Feel Better are all about making that time with cancer easier, by reinstilling women and girls with confidence in themselves. As a recipient of this charity’s work I can surely say if you look good, you do feel better!

So mum (Donna) , Rachel and Victoria, Tanya and Beth- I think you’re bonkers but amazing! While I had intended on doing the run myself, you would never have seen me tackling a 10 mile run on a Sunday morning, nor leaving early enough to be BACK in time to make breakfast! Heroes.

I’d love it if you could take a moment and donate some money towards their cause. The support will get them through the miles but MORE IMPORTANTLY fund the awesome work if the charities that have contributed so immensely into getting me where I am today. I can certainly say without the work of Bloodwise and Anthony Nolan I wouldn’t be typing these words, and without Look Good Feel Better I wouldn’t be doing it with as much confidence. 
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Remember, every little helps! Here’s their team page where you can donate to their induvidual pages https://www.justgiving.com/teams/Run4Remission

Keep Smiling (and running) 💃💃💃👟
Emily

World Cancer Day

Today, Wednesday February the 4th is World Cancer Day. It’s a day you may know nothing about, or only know of from sharing a picture of a candle on Facebook. You may have guessed something was up from the constant news that now, instead of the 1 in 3 statistics we are accustomed to, we now have a 50% risk each of developing cancer.10967809_1623578781195248_1155630041_n

For me though, it’s a little more than a ‘share this if…’ picture day, and more than just a # on twitter.

It is a day to remember and hope, a day to learn.

The announcements of increased risk for all those born after 1960 needs to mean something. We need to take this day, this world caner as a day for change and action. Allow this day to mean more than just one where you like a Facebook post.

We need to stand together, reduce personal life risk, educate ourselves on symptoms and take responsibility of our own health- so we can prevent cancer where possible, spot cancer early when it does develop and see screening save lives.

Currently 4 in 10 cancers are potentially preventable. Think of the impact a change in lifestyle could have rationally. Currently half of all cancers are diagnosed after they have spread. Think of the impact education could give to thousands of people, in cases where secondary cancers mean an ‘incurable’ diagnosis. Currently too many people are skipping routine cancer screening. Think of the impact if everyone who got a cancer screening letter in the post actually went to their appointments, as above cancers would be detected earlier and could improve prognosis.

I know these things won’t save everyone, and some people will be diagnosed after their cancer has metalized, but surely making an effort with the above can only improve things.

The knowledge applies to all ages. Recently someone two years above me in school was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. This means that between the pupils of three consecutive school years at my high school, 4 have had cancer by the time the oldest is 20. And that’s from my working knowledge. The risk of having cancer by 24 is around 1 in 282, which is relatively low risk, but in the statistics game this meant I was the second person in my school year diagnosed by the age of 16.

We all need to be aware. We need to unite in this fight and never let cancer have any sort of chance.

We need to support the researchers, the movers and shakers, the little fish with big ideas and those tireless campaigners funding the research. They are finding better treatments, kinder treatments and hoping for a day where all cancers can be cured, and during that treatment time you have a great quality of life.

So go, educate yourselves! Knowing will not make you any more likely to have cancer.

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And in adults…

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Change things up!

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Today is for all those I’ve met along this journey- Chloe, Jade, Beatrice, Both Tom’s, Jacob, Yusuf, Cory, Dan, Cameron, Tina, Sonali, Ffion, Hwyel, Jordan, Libby, Beau, Elenid, Harriet, Andrew, Catrin, Louis, Alex, Dave, Amy, Rosa, and so many other people….

And especially for those we’ve lost, Pauline, Becky, Joe and a big inspiration, little Margot. There are others, inspirations and many I wish I could have met.

Hope you take something from this blog today. Its a bit emotional for me, managing my first blog since transplant and carrying what I see to be an incredibly important message.

Keep Smiling,

Emily

 

Why I love…the Teenage Cancer Trust

With tonight being Halloween a blog about the Teenage Cancer Trust may not seem to be as topical as you may want to be reading. Halloween is the night of tricks and treats, frights, spooks, gory make up and if you’re unlucky enough a dosing of flour and eggs.

For many Halloween is terrifying, and seeing as I’m sat here blogging you can tell I’m not the biggest fan of such frights. images (1)

I didn’t want to talk topically about fear, frights shock or horror because we all know tha cancer is full of that without me boring you with a blog about it. I guess most of you know or can imagine the gut wrenching awfulness that comes with a cancer diagnosis as a teen, so why draw it out. Instead this blog is about some people I love, the people who make it all ‘ok’ (as ok as it can get) These are the people who as a Halloween-o-phobe you open the door to expecting a ghoul and find a fairy princess there.

So who are these people? Well if you’ve read the top, they are the Teenage Cancer Trust, a charity that before a personal connection most people probably hadn’t heard of before this year, and a charity that deserves much more attention than they get. A charity who I just described as the Fairy Princess of a teenage cancer diagnosis.

If you have no previous connection to Teenage Cancer Trust and don’t really know who they are, or what they do, you will be blown away. By building wards for cancer patients they give the opportunity for teenage patients to be in their natural place- with other teens and young people, even when they’re having treatment. It allows them to have space, watch TV and have some of the choices you would have in your own home. It allows young people, like me to be in their own, with their own and not with the babies or the grannies.

And why do I love them? Concisely put, they made the difference between hope and defeat in the face of my own diagnosis nearly a year ago. They made the difference between being with other teens, and being with 80 year old women telling me about how you I am. They made the difference between normal conversation and well meant pity and grandchild chatting. I firmly feel that an ordinary ward has a much more pessimistic feel than any TCT ward, with big colourful sofas and random light up jukeboxes.k

I love what they do so much, I love what they stand for and I love Roger Daultrey. I love the ethos that a hospital ward shouldn’t have to look like a hospital ward. I love that you can have friends to visit. I love that when they do visit you don’t have to be huddled around a hospital bed, that you can play (I tried!) pool, watch films or just chat.

The difference it makes, to be around others your own age, for them to also be bald, lugging around drip stands and have a complete understanding everything that is happening is completely priceless. I do think it is the friends from the TCT ward that I made that got me through treatment.

 

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I inhabited the best at the front of the picture for the best part of 2 months, which when I was put in another bed resulted in my mum walking in on the poor girl in it several times!

My diagnosis was an extremely confusing time. Having my consultant be able to say ‘let me take you to the ward, it’s where you’ll be looked after’ and even with a quick off-the-cuff visit to be able to speak to some nurses, the ward manager, and day doctor is incredibly reassuring. My mum often says that she saw a light when we got to that ward, that she thought everything would be alright after arriving there. She takes pleasure in describing the Cardiff ward, the Skypad as looking like a penthouse youth club. To be fair to my mum, that’s exactly what it looks like.

If you haven’t quite got it already, the Teenage Cancer Trust are more than just people who build wards, and they are much more than a name of a collecting tin, the name of something ‘which would never happen to me’. Teenage Cancer Trust means you are supported, so that when you’re ill on Christmas morning, there’s a nurse dance around your bed. The teenage cancer trust means that when all you want is duck pancakes, your mum can cook some in a microwave for you. The Teenage Cancer Trust means that when your brother visits you, he can watch TV with you, and it isn’t a case of ‘let’s stare at Emily for the next hour’. It meant that I have made amazing friends. I meant while I was sleeping, my mum had other mums to sit and eat breakfast with. It meant everything really. Everything and so much more because I am here to tell the world of my love for this charity. Hey deserve every penny they get because that penny will go towards providing lifesaving treatment to someone like me.

Everything they do may seem simple, grouping teens together for chemo, but it is so so much more than a room to have treatment in. A place for treatment, but also a place to try and live, when your life isn’t yours to be lived, but tucked away in a box.

I love Teenage Cancer Trust, because they are there for you wholeheartedly in a time of need that you never thought imaginable.

If you want to see some more pictures of the teenage cancer trust ward yourself, (the above are from Cardiff) or find out more about the awesome stuff they do, check out www.teenagecancertrust.org

Hope you liked this blog, enjoy the rest of this spooktacular night!

Keep smiling (and trick or treating!)🎃

-Em xx

 

A Week of Public Speaking…

This week really has been one for the public speaking, and an extremely busy one.

What with this being the last week in school before half term I was incredibly busy anyway!

So, on Tuesday, Simon Weston spoke at my school! He was invited to speak to motivate students to try their hardest and I went as a 6th form representative. Let’s just say he spoke incredibly, and is definitely worthy of the title of Britain’s favourite hero.

Me and Simon Weston!

Me and Simon Weston!

He stuck around to chat afterwards, and I had a chat to him about public speaking and got some great tips on speaking front of a crowd, especially as I’m not one for writing speeches. The quick chat we had gave me loads of confidence in just trying my best and not worrying if I absolutely crash and burn! I feel very honoured to have met and personally spoken to him. His public speaking was just…wow and hope his style and tips rubbed off on me!

The 2nd speakingy thing this week was being a patient representative at the Cardiff Connect Event for the Leukaemia and Lymphoma Association which was an event I loved! It was set up to just show what the charity was up to, and because I was the guest speaker the theme of the evening was Childhood Lymphomas. It really was fascinating because as Non Hodgkin Lymphoma is fairly uncommon for my age, and Burkitts even more so, I got to hear all about the leaps that have been made in lymphoma treatment, research and mortality rates. I actually found it quite surreal because I’ve never me anyone with Burkitts before or really heard it be mentioned by anyone else at all, so to hear so much about it and meet some paediatrician lymphoma specialist really was amazing. The speaking was a few Q & As to say about how treatment was, and how I found out I had cancer, just make those there more aware. It was a really good atmosphere to speak in, intimate and everyone was lovely. I definitely sound like a total medical nerd when talking about it, but I heard a really interesting story about the discovery of a chemotherapy drug, Vincristine.

1062988_1581511465401980_549278671_n‘Once upon a time, in the West Indies during the 60’s pharmaceutical companies were interested in the doings of casual labourers harvesting sugar cane. In those parts you couldn’t work on the sugar plantations if you were diabetic, so many labourers knew they had to conceal the glucose in their urine to get a job. Somehow they managed to make their urine clear of sugars, drinking a tea made from periwinkle leaves, and it appeared to work, they would turn up, by classed non diabetic (according to their wee) and get the casual work. Of course, with pharmaceuticals thinking this could be the big time for treating diabetes. So they fed this brewed stuff to rats and…….NOTHING happened. A bit confused, the scientists injected the rats, BAM within a week they were all dead. Upon examination hey found the solution had in its pure form, wiped out the bone marrow and immune system of these rats- VIOLA they had found a cytotoxic drug, a.k.a chemotherapy, and is one of the drugs I received during my treatment.

Pretty fascinating right? Most of you will probably have skipped through that but, to all science brains out there, you learn something new every day.

That takes me nicely onto probably the main-ish thing for the week, and definitely the bigger of the two speaking engagements- the Mayor of Newport’s Charity Gala!

For those who don’t know, I first met the Mayor when he visited the TCT ward Skypad when I was an inpatient this year, and then chose it as one of his charities for the year. I have been sat on his charity panel, and was asked to attend the gala last night as a guest and representative of the Teenage Cancer Trust!

It was held at the Celtic Manor and was a thoroughly great evening. I had gorgeous food, met some great people (I think we had the best table!) and did my speech. I was so so pleased with it and not to blow my own trumpet, was definitely the best one I’ve done so far! I stood up and told everyone about who I am, that I’d had cancer and what that meant as a teenager and more importantly, what the teenage Cancer trust meant to me as a teen with cancer. I really hope it boosted the money raised and helped all the attendees REALLY know why them parting with their dosh was so important. They think more than £20,000 was raised in the evening which was amazing, and I got the RemissionPossible word out there which is always what I want. Two of the people at my table said they were going to sign up to the Delete Blood Cancer Stem Cell register after me talking to them as well which was amazing!10743405_1581509612068832_462219396_n

Because the theme of the night was Newport’s Finest, there were quite a few celebrities, that I chatted with and stuff, checkout the pictures below to see if you know who they are! There’s all sorts, from authors to rugby players to a west end star!

As always, tweet us, follow us, like us, share us, and support us! (Especially if you are new to RemissionPossible!)

Of course if you are interested in talking to me more, get involved have me to speak at an event, drop me an email through the Contact Us! Page.

The next blog will be, called ‘Why I love…Teenage Cancer Trust’

Keep Smiling!

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P.S. I’ve realised a lot of our widgets don’t show up on the mobile app, so you can follow us on twitter @remissionpos and my twitter is @emy_clark and you can like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/remissionpossible2014

P.P.S As far as the discovery of Vincristine and the Periwinkle plant is concerned, there is speculation that the periwinkle tea didn’t reduce blood sugars at all, it just meant those farmers weren’t drinking their usual tea with sugar in!!!

Why I love…Fundraising

wpid-img_20140915_195945.jpgWhy I love….Fundraising

I love crazy charity fundraising. I love it. Why?

-Because it make a massive difference to all of the charities that matter to us all and it can often turn it into FUNdraising!

I love fundraing, I’ve said it once again. Love it when people do challenges to fundraise on my behalf, love arranging fundraisers, love seeing the generosity of others and love hearing about others who fundraise.

I also love it because it’s mental. A hundred years ago who would have thought climbing mountains, waxing your legs, jumping out a plane and selling cake would become such a big part of society, and something that we all (pretty much) are a part of. Who would have thought trekking, cycling, running would have provided vital services and be funding lifesaving research.
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I Won an Award!

As the title appropriately suggests…I won an award! Pretty groovy right?

It means that you are no reading the blog of one of the Lymphoma Association’s Beacons of Hope. I love that. Beacon of Hope, makes me sound strong, tall, and almost like a mountainous glass sculpture. Lovely.

So I heard I’d won it about a month ago, and travelled up to Aylesbury near Oxford to collect the award, and boy was it an eventful evening!

Me and Alice Arnold!

Me and Alice Arnold!

For one, I’d gone to school on Thursday and anyone who’s knows some decent geography will know that Aylesbury is a fair old slog from South Wales, so regardless of traffic we were already pushing it. As you can imagine, a road closure didn’t help us in the slightest!
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Back to School and Bucket Collect

 

So this isn’t exactly a blog….because I wrote a guest blog for Chris’ Cancer Community!

It’s kind of about how cancer affects education, and kind of about this back to school season (even though it’s now the 3rd week of school!) you can read it here- http://www.chris-cancercommunity.com/cancer-stopping-education-emilys-story/

(But first check out the rest of what’s been written!)

Over the course of writing this blog, I have had views from many different countries, something which greatly excites me! I can officially say that RemissionPossible has been viewed in all of the inhabited continents, and this blog is dedicated to all of you, my non-UK, international readers!

I would love to hear from you, where you’re from, and how you got to hearing about this blog. The thought that, as a teenage from little ol’ wales I might be known, by and affect people from Brazil, Taiwan, India, and Belgium….just to name a few
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